Get.On Stress

Tim Gouw on Pexels

 

Project Description

Occupational stress is associated with numerous psychological and emotional problems, such as depression and anxiety, and can have a significant economic cost due to loss of productivity, absenteeism or incapacity to work.

Numerous studies prove the effectiveness of traditional face-to-face training; however, it is costly and time-consuming. Online-based interventions to reduce occupational stress counteract these disadvantages, but there is little evidence to date. Persons from the general population who experience occupational stress (N=260) are randomly assigned to the intervention group (IG) or the 6-month waiting list control group in a randomized controlled trial. Participants will receive weekly feedback from an online coach on each of the 7 training sessions.

Efficacy will be assessed at pre- and post-trial, after 6 months, and as an extended follow-up for the IG after 12 months. Primary outcome is perceived stress. Cost effectiveness is also reviewed.

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Funding & Cooperation

BARMER

Assoc. Prof. Dr. David Daniel Ebert
Assoc. Prof. Dr. David Daniel Ebert
Associate Professor, VU Amsterdam

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